UC at Denver and Health Sciences Center

Whistleblower Exposes Culture of

Cruelty at UC at Denver and Health

 Sciences Center

Mouse with Lesion

An animal care technician who worked at the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center (UCHSC) for five years turned to PETA when officials refused to deal with serious charges of neglect and mistreatment. The whistleblower reportedly witnessed repeated violations of federal laws and regulations governing the care and use of animals in laboratories, including the following:

  • Failure to provide veterinary care and euthanasia in a timely manner
  • Improperly trained animal care employees
  • Improper review and approval of experiments
  • Inadequate anesthesia during painful surgeries

For nearly a decade, Moshe Solomonow, director of the Musculoskeletal Disorders Laboratory at UCHSC, has been conducting similar invasive back surgery experiments on cats by cutting down to their spinal tissue and attaching an “S” hook to their spinal ligaments. A machine then applies pressure in an effort to approximate what might happen if the cats were carrying heavy loads on their backs.

Whistleblower’s undercover footage
Other viewing options

The whistleblower told PETA that chloralose, the drug that the cats were being given as an anesthetic, did not appear to be effective and that the cats were still moving and responding to light and sound after the drug was administered. The whistleblower had reason to worry—for more than 40 years, veterinarians have said that chloralose alone does not provide adequate anesthesia for surgery. Remarkably, Solomonow has been killing cats and using inadequate anesthesia for invasive procedures for more than 15 years, funded mostly by taxpayers through federal research grants.

Rabbit with Ulcer

Rabbit with skin lesions

The whistleblower also reported observing a monkey with a prolapsed colon who was left to suffer for hours before she was euthanized, a cat whose eye was swollen shut and was left without veterinary care for nearly a month, a rabbit who did not appear to be fully anesthetized killed by having his heart punctured with a needle.

PETA has asked the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to conduct an immediate investigation and is calling on UCHSC to dismiss the current animal care and use committee and replace it with members who are willing to do their jobs.

Please join us by contacting the president of the University of Colorado to voice your concern.

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WWW.MEATRIX.COM

www.meatrix.com

 Based on THE MATRIX

 A great video series for kids to learn about how important it is to protect animals from farming abuses.

hope for two minutes

http://www.brightlion.com/InHope/InHope_En.aspx

For every parent and pet owner. A must see. Please pass along. This movie is far more gentle than most I have seen on these topics. It may even be suitable for someone over 14 or 15. You decide. But, please take a moment to view it. You will want to pass it on.

This moving presentation is about 2 minutes. It is also available to view in other languages. See the site menu once you get there please.

Sheree

MEAT.ORG – GO NOW

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SOMETHING WE CAN ALL DO

See the link below. Go to it 🙂

Print out the sample letter for your Grocer and favorite restaurants. Sign your name. Deliver it. 🙂

Simple Simon and sooooo important. Ya know, so many of us let other people do the stinky work, because we are too busy, too tired, too overwhelmed with our own *stuff*. But, if we don’t all get together in our local communities to chip in, then that’s way sucky. Cut and paste this link now please.

http://www.certifiedhumane.org/letters.html

 This link will take you to some sample letters you can give to your local GROCERY STORES. You can also mail it if you like, but hand delivery would be better. I plan to print out a few and take them around town. Keep them in your glove compartment so that when you drive by a store you can quickly run in with a letter for the Manager. 🙂 Isn’t this a great idea?

 Here’s a video to help you along:

 http://www.meat.org

 Bring a bucket with you. Sheree

DOWNER COW BURGER ANYONE?

cow_downed31.jpg 

Market For Downer Cow Beef Is Dying
http://www.nodowners.org

People STILL sell this meat.
For Human Consumption.
You just don’t know about it.

More and More supermarkets are refusing to purchase any meat made from what’s commonly called a “downer cow”.

Our KIRO team 7 investigation uncovers that customers are starting to ask tough questions about where their beef comes from.

Downers are cattle that can’t walk on their own into a slaughterhouse, and are banned for sale in many Washington sale barns.

However, with proper inspection, it is legal to slaughter them for food.
When Federal meat inspectors do their jobs, they’re suppose to ask themselves this question.

“Does it meet the consumers expectations?”

In the case of most downer dairy cows, USDA inspectors have been saying yes.

Consumers however don’t usually agree.

Some of the biggest beef buyers in the country, such as Safeway, Albertsons, and the federal school lunch program, all refuse to buy any beef derived from dairy cows that arrive at slaughterhouses in “downer” condition.

For example, Safeway tells KIRO Team 7 Investigators:

“We have very high quality specifications for our ground beef. Our Suppliers sign agreements so they do not sell products to us from downer cattle.”

Safeway’s response comes after KIRO Team 7 Investigators videotaped downer transactions at Midway Meats in Chehalis.

Last fall, we aired a series of reports raising questions about inspection and humane treatment of dying, sick or crippled dairy cattle.

University of Washington marketing guru Richard Yalch says big meat buyers have started taking a tough-and-very-public stand against downer meat, or risk alienating customers.

“Most supermarkets want to talk about ‘We have the best meat’, best this, best that. Taking meat from a sick or hurt animal would certainly counter that kind of claim.”

The majority of consumers we talked with say even if these crippled or sick cows were properly inspected, they’d prefer to eat beef from a healthier source.

“It shouldn’t go in at all, it should be destroyed.”

“I think it’s pretty sad. There need to be more investigation into this kind of thing if the product is eventually coming to consumers.”

And if downer meat continues to be mixed into our food, many beef eaters who watched our investigation support “labeling”.

“I think all of our food should be labeled. Whether it be genetically engineered or of substandard quality, or something different that what we expect as average consumers. We deserve to be protected with that kind of disclosure.

Adam Karp agrees. He’s an attorney for Pasado’s Safe Haven, the animal rights organization credited with helping pass Washington’s Cruelty to Animals law. They should know that downer cows are being included in the product. They should also be aware that the animal in the product may not be humanely slaughtered.

He says there is a national movement to outlaw the use of downers for human consumption. However, a dwindling marketplace for the product might end the sale of the meat long before we see any new regulation.
We asked Midway Meats, the Washington State Beef Commission and the Dairy Products Commission to talk to us regarding this story and they refused. That entire group has been complaining to KIRO-TV about unfair coverage of this topic.

WE HAVE A LONG WAY TO GO. PLEASE DONATE TO http://www.nodowners.org/ SO THEY CAN CONTINUE TO ERASE THIS INSANITY. PLEASE AT LEAST…ASK YOUR OWN GROCER IF THEY USE THE MEAT OF DOWNER COWS? OR ANY OTHER ANIMALS? YOU COULD EVEN SEND THEM A LETTER AND ASK THEM TO RESPOND IN WRITING. THIS IS EASY STUFF. JUST GET UP PLEASE. HELP US.

Failed Prosecutions

http://www.nodowners.org/

Please donate so they can continue to push.

Indiana: A downed cow was left for hours in distress in a stockyard parking lot. When the stockyard owner failed to take responsibility for the animal, law enforcement called a veterinarian who examined and then euthanized the cow. State’s action: Charges were filed, but the matter was not prosecuted. Although the humane society continues to receive complaints, the stockyard continues to operate with impunity.

New York: Two downed cows were left for hours in a stockyard parking lot. One died from her ailments, while the second was dragged onto a truck at the end of the day. State’s action: Charges were filed and the District Attorney’s office prosecuted the case. Approximately two and a half years after the incident, after numerous discussions with the defendants and their attorneys, the District Attorney’s office concluded that “the current situation as it relates to the subject problem is filled with competing interest [and] uncertainty as to rights and responsibility… At present, many of the people involved are uncertain as to what they can or should do as to animals in this situation”. The matter was referred to mediation, and no penalties were assessed.

Texas: One end of a chain was attached to a stationary post, while the other was fastened around the neck of a disabled cow in a transportation trailer. As the truck drove out from under the animal, the cow was dragged across the floor of the trailer, up a cleated ramp, and dropped approximately four feet to the ground. The cow remained alive and conscious for approximately 2 days before being destroyed. State’s action: None.
Downed Animal . . .

Just the words produce an image of a suffering, sick animal. Sadly, this nightmarish vision is all too real every year for untold numbers of animals at stockyards, slaughterhouses, and production farms. The meat and dairy industries call them “downers”- animals so diseased or badly injured that they cannot even walk.

Many segments of the meat industry deal in “downers” because they can still sell them for human consumption. Profit, not humane considerations, guides industry practice and downed animals suffer gross negligence and abuse at livestock facilities across the country.

Fortunately, reforms stipulated by the USDA have, for now, stopped the worst abuses of downed cattle at stockyards and farms, following the discovery of a BSE-infected dairy cow in Washington state in December 2003.
The resultant, USDA-mandated ban on the slaughter of downed cattle for human consumption has prevented countless thousands of downed cattle from being dragged, bulldozed or otherwise abused to move them alive to the slaughterhouse.

However, the current USDA ban does nothing for animals other than cattle, and for countless sheep, pigs, and other farm animals who become downed every year, the misery continues. These downed animals may lie in alleyways, without food, water or veterinary care, until it’s convenient to take them to slaughter.

In some cases, downed animals die of neglect. If they are still alive to meet the slaughterhouse truck, they are typically moved by the easiest, but least humane ways, which can include being dragged with chains and being pushed with tractors or forklifts. These practices cause injuries ranging from bruises and abrasions to torn ligaments, broken bones, and dislocated joints.

Fortunately, the incidence of downed cattle abuse appears to be declining since the USDA ban on their slaughter for human consumption.
For those cattle who do become downed on the farm or at the stockyard, on-site euthanasia no longer presents an economic loss.

However, as fears over “mad cow” disease begin to fade in the public’s mind, cattle industry lobbyists are continually maneuvering to weaken the USDA’s ban. In recent legislative sessions, they have managed to introduce legislation that will allow downed cattle to be slaughtered for human consumption. Although the bill died in the last session of Congress, we must continually guard against industry efforts to undermine downed animal protection.

In the meantime, the meat industry will continue to use and abuse livestock who are “downers” until we pass laws to ban downed animal cruelties for all farm animals. The Downed Animal Protection Act, a federal bill which applies to all farm animals, has been introduced repeatedly (and defeated) in past legislative sessions, and we expect it to be reintroduced during the 109th Congress as well.

organic farmers by state LINKS

Directory of Pasture-Based Farmers

WWW.EATWILD.COM

United States, Canada and Republic of Panama

The Eatwild.com Directory of Pasture-Based Farmers lists more than 800 farms, making it the most comprehensive source for grass-fed meat and dairy products in the United States and Canada.

To be listed on Eatwild, producers must certify that they meet our exacting criteria. These standards insure that the animals and the land are well-treated and that the products are exceptionally high in nutrition and are free of antibiotics and added hormones. Many of the farms are organically certified; others lack certification, but follow many of the organic standards. We recommend that you visit your supplier and make sure that the farm satisfies your own criteria.

Farm products include pastured beef, lamb, bison (buffalo), rabbits, chevon (goat meat), deer, chicken and turkey. You will also find eggs from pastured hens and milk, butter and cheese from grass-fed cows or goats.

State-by-State Farm List: To find a grass-based farm close to you, click on your state in the map below or use the alphabetical list at the bottom of this page.

Direct Shipping: If you can’t find what you want locally, or want products shipped directly to you, go to our Multi-State Listing.

Beyond the Farm: Looking for grass-fed products in smaller quantities, or at a restaurant? Eatwild is adding a Beyond the Farm page to each state that lists farmers markets, stores, restaurants or buying clubs that feature grass-fed meat and dairy products. To find these listings, first click on your state in the map below, then look for Beyond the Farm in the upper right corner of the state page.

Click on a state, country, or region below to find suppliers…

International

Click here to read “How to make sure you’re getting healthy, tender meat.” 
For advice on purchasing meat in bulk, read Buying Meat for Your Freezer.

 

Or choose by name…

Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | California | Colorado | Connecticut | Delaware | Florida | Georgia
Hawaii | Idaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Kansas | Kentucky | Louisiana | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts
Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri | Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Hampshire | New Jersey
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| New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | Pennsylvania
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Virginia | Washington | West Virginia | Wisconsin | Wyoming | CANADA | Multi-State| International