HOW TO DO THE NUMBERS

Here’s how to do the numbers. It takes 5 minutes.

Using the english alphabet  (regular)  A=1   B = 2  C = 3   ect

N   A   M   E

14  1  13  5

Assign the right number to the letters. Write them under the letters.

Now we are first looking for the CROSS NUMBER.

For the horizontal number, add the numbers across ONE DIGIT AT A TIME.

then add vertically, as you normally would.

THEN ADD TOGETHER.    NAME IS ….15 H –  34 V  49 HV

TO FIND THE WNR ADD THIS STRING TO THAT.

which number represents =   128 h –  263 v  –  391 hv

THAT’S THE SECRET IN MANY CASES.

it’s not the number itself, but WHICH NUMBER REPRESENTS those numbers.

do you own name and practice, then do the strings I have posted.

Using the backwards alhabet  Z= 1  Y= 2  etc.

WNR JESUS CHRIST = 666

 

 

 

obama, zion and 666

 I DON’T THINK IT’S REALLY BARACK. IT’S BARAK. BARAK IN HEBREW MEANS *BLESSING*, BUT WHOSE

BLESSING ????  BARAK   IS REALLY    ARAB  11   The k is 11. 

look at the name barak backwards. the #11 is the God # on the bwa.

WNR THE GREAT PYRAMID OF GIZA =  117 H–234 V– 351 HV

WNR THE BIN LADEN FAMILY = 117   234    351

WHO IS BARAK HUSSEIN OBAMA = 117   234   351

BWA  WNR JESUS CHRIST = 666 ………………..

BWA  WNR SIX HUNDRED SIXTY SIX = 760 HV …………..

BWA  WNR PRESIDENT BARACK HUSSEIN OBAMA = 760 V ……………..

 

BWA  MEANS BACKWARDS ALPHABET  Z=1  Y = 2  etc.  …………

WNR MEANS   WHICH NUMBER REPRESENTS  ………….

Now the good question is why does this align? How would

be know whether or not this is placed this way to throw

someone off, or to communicate who Obama is.

Oh, and remember that Obama’s zip code is 60606

then this: using the regular alphabet

 FWA WNR THE AGENDA OF ZION 760 HV

BWA WNR SIX HUNDRED SIXTY SIX 760 HV

For those of you who email me and ask me to translate what

all of this means, I can’t help you on that. I don’t know.

I can only show you the numbers. I am only certain of

a couple of things, as the numbers are just to sync, over

and over to ignore- and that’s WHO is using the BWA.

And who there Jesus is NOT. It’s not Jesus Christ.

Something else to consider. This came to me as I was

watching a program on NG and they were doing

a documentary on the Chicago Mob and Vegas. I had

no idea the Chicago Mob had such a strangle hold

on Vegas. I grew up there. I knew it all mafia, but I didn’t

know it was Chicago mafia.

Obama is from Chicago. 60606

And, it is my feeling that Area 51 outside LV is the main location

for communications with extraterrestrial life. And, a giant lab

for making and testing antigravity aircraft.

So, there is a strong connection inherent in CHICAGO AND VEGAS

Las Vegas holds one of the largest populations of Mormons in

the country. I was one of them.

Obama teamed with Orin Hatch of Utah for a major bill to save

church tithings, which is worth billions to the mormon church.

He then turned around and *accidentally* axed children’s health

care in his state. He said he pushed the wrong button. button – according to reliable political blogs I read. He was a newbie

senator when Hatch got with him on the tithing bill.

Not only that, but Obama’s church… (United) CHURCH OF CHRIST is the

original name of the mormon church.

Don’t worry, Hillary’s numbers are scary too. Mcain’s as well.

Watch to see who they put on the tkt as VP. If it’s Colin Powell or Mitt

Romney, it’s time to get out the sleeping pills.  lol

GOOD NIGHT AND GOOD LUCK

read the blog from a few months ago to learn the system. it’s simple.

 

 

BIG MEDIA RULINGS

 

Senate Committee Votes to Throw Out FCC RulesThe Senate Commerce Committee passed a “resolution of disapproval” that would veto the FCC’s latest attempt to dismantle longstanding media ownership limits.

Free Press

 

Senate Panel Rejects New Media Ownership Rule

A Senate committee voted to nullify a recently approved FCC rule that allows media companies to own a newspaper and a television station in the same market.

John Dunbar, Associated Press

 

 

 

 

Senate Commerce Committee Passes Resolution to Block FCC Rule Change

The Senate Commerce Committeeapproved without debate a resolution sponsored by Sen. Byron Dorgan (D-N.D.) to invalidate the FCC’s decision to loosen the newspaper-broadcast cross-ownership rules.

John Eggerton, Broadcasting & Cable

 

 

 

 

Newsday Suitors Wait to See If Deal Flies

With media mogul Rupert Murdoch treating his reported purchase of Newsday as a fait accompli, other potential purchasers are said to be buttressing their offers or waiting in the wings should regulators shoot down News Corp.’s bid.

Mark Harrington and Thomas Maier, Newsday

 

 

 

 

Sad Day for Journalism if Murdoch Swallows Newsday

What is the point of FCC regulation and antitrust theory if one man can rule the roost in even the nation’s largest media market with no restrictions on his acquisitiveness?

Ruth Hochberger, Huffington Post

 

 

 

 

Rupert Murdoch’s Newspaper Addiction

Rupert Murdoch is a) addicted to newspapers, b) addicted to power, c) needs to break the rules, or d) all of the above.

Lauren Rich Fine, PaidContent

 

  

Stop the FCC’s Big Handout to Big Media

Use Publicly Owned Airwaves Wisely

The FCC has a chance to expand wireless and Internet opportunities for millions of Americans. And it should do so by allocating frequencies available after TV stations switch from analog to digital in February.

Detroit News

 

 

 

 

Save the Web

We need an internet that has enough regulation to prevent the giant telecom companies from changing its fundamental workings.

Reno News & Review

 

 

 

 

FCC Chairman Calls Comcast Liar, Critics Pile On

Comcast has lied about how and why it blocks peer-to-peer Internet traffic, and may be lying in its promise to stop some of its practices by year end, said the FCC Chairman Kevin Martin.

Richard Adhikari, eCommerce Times

 

 

 

 

FCC Stanford Hearing

“I am extremely uncomfortable with the idea that my ability to speak my mind to whoever wants to hear is a matter of corporate grace rather than constitutional right,” Harold Feld told FCC Commissioners.

Ryan Blethen, Seattle Times

 

 

 

 

Maybe the FCC Can Handle the Truth

Maybe the FCC can handle the truth. It looks as if the Commission is preparing to take some action against Comcast.

Art Brodsky, Public Knowledge

 

 

 

 

Virgin CEO Wants to ‘Engage’ on Neutrality

Cable providers must engage with issues such as Net Neutrality, privacy, copyright and child protection, Virgin CEO Neil Berkett told an industry conference.

Dave West, Digital Spy

 

  

Support the Internet Freedom Preservation Act

 

 

 

 

TV’s Response to Pentagon Propaganda? Never Happened

The quest for quality journalism and for the truth about the fast sell on the Iraq war just hit a new low. And today, in the ensuing days, our loyal Bush lapdog news outlets are either dismissing the damning revelation or pretending it never happened.

Josh Silver, Huffington Post

 

 

 

 

A 7,600-Word Disappearing Act

The New York Times story about the Pentagon pundits has implications of illegal government propaganda and, possibly, improper financial gains. But the story has all but disappeared from the media that allowed it to happen.

Barry Sussman, Nieman Watchdog

 

 

 

 

Public Needs Straight Talk on Defense Matters, Not Spin

A front-page story in Sunday’s New York Times regarding the Pentagon’s behind-the-scenes machination of on-air military analysts offers a sad commentary on the state of the media, the state of the government and the state of civic engagement.

Asheville Citizen-Times

 

 

 

 

Sleeping with the Enemy

Are the cable network’s execs suffering from collective amnesia? Do they not remember the extremely distant relationship Tony Snow had with the truth during his time as President Bush’s mouthpiece?

Arianna Huffington, Huffington Post

 

 

 

 

Old Journalists, New Plan

A new attempt at online journalism has launched in St. Louis. But its creators aren’t following the usual mode setting out on a wing and a prayer, betting that notice and funding will come their way before the operation collapses.

Michael Miner, Chicago Reader

 

 

 

 

Pay No Attention to the Media Behind the Curtain

Reporters are not merely conduits for the campaign’s discourse; they create the campaign’s discourse as much as the candidates themselves.

Paul Waldman, American Prospect

 

Who benefits from Obama flap? Obama. Looks like a set up by Bush to me.

Ya know, not all Muslims are bad. the Saudi elite and Bushies are close. I said it first. I will say it again. Obama can’t possibly be who he says he is, and when you take EVERYTHING into consideration (read my blog), it’s a no brainer. Bush wants Obama. Romney wants Obama. They DO NOT want Clinton. Am I the only sober one still standing?

 Obama’s wife sits on CFR. And you think they are bringing the troops home?  LOL

They are going to rearrange the loungers.

So, tonight’s breaking news is another attempt to shift attention away from Rev. Wright and onto the sympathy factor for Obama. Oh My – The Outrage !!  Are they hiding all that secret info about Obama’s secret trip to Iran? So, if there is nothing found in the passport probe, what’s the harm in using it as a tool to turn a tide?

Gawd, we’re so stupid.

Nothing that happens from here on out is what it appears to be. Look to see who benefits. Then have some cake and stop worrying. But, go and vote and you have a brand spankin new covenant with their Gods. You can have them.

whoohooo

The right is pushing Romney for VP

It’s official. They want to lose. But why? Why would they want to lose…..unless they could win? But, in order to win, it would take a Clinton or an Obama to win for them. Which one is on their side? Or, are both actors in this Grand Illusion?  Clearly, they don’t want McCain. And, to match him up with Romney is the kiss of death. NOTHING would energize democrats (non mormon) more than a McCain Romney tkt.

 I told you not to count out Romney. There was a reason for that.

McCain courts secret radical religious group

And who, exactly, is the Council for National Policy? I’m glad you asked.

U.S. News reported during the ‘04 campaign:

The supersecret Council for National Policy, founded at the onset of the Reagan era, will be meeting in New York at an undisclosed location in hopes of avoiding protesters. The thousand member group includes political heavyweights like John Ashcroft, Bill Frist, and Tom DeLay, religious leaders from Pat Robertson to James Dobson, media moguls like Steve Forbes, and conservative billionaires Howard Ahmanson and Nelson Bunker Hunt. Conservative Republicans boast that the council’s meeting is the “real” convention. “It’s the old smoke-filled room, but I wouldn’t say it’s corrupt,” says a source. “Rather it’s just where the work gets done.”

McCain Courts Secret Radical Religious Conservative Group

 

By Steve Benen, The Carpetbagger Report
Posted on March 8, 2008, Printed on March 11, 2008
http://www.alternet.org/bloggers/http://www.thecarpetbaggerreport.com//79060/

Usually, political groups trip over one another to try and gain public notoriety and attention. The Council for National Policy, meanwhile, would be perfectly happy if the public didn’t even know it exists. (I’ve long believed the easiest job on Earth would be to serve as this group’s press secretary.)

The CNP is made up of many heavy-hitters from the religious right and conservative movement in general, and they meet periodically to plot and scheme. It may sound excessively cloak-and-dagger of the group, but the CNP has a list of formal rules, one of which reads, “The media should not know when or where we meet or who takes part in our programs, before or after a meeting.”

Fortunately, details routinely leak. Today in New Orleans, for example, the CNP will gather and hear from none other than John McCain. (You know, the one who “refuses to pander” to anyone.)

Sen. John McCain, in his post-victory debut before the conservative movement’s top donors and leaders, will address the Council for National Policy’s annual winter meeting here today.

His remarks at the event, which has always been closed to the public and will have only a partial accommodation of the press this year for the first time, could turn out to be his make-or-break pitch for support from some of the right’s most influential critics of his past positions and policies.

“This is the most distinguished collection of conservative leaders and donors, and he was anxious to appear as part of his ongoing effort to consolidate support for his candidacy within the conservative movement,” said Charlie Black, Mr. McCain’s campaign adviser.

Not everyone will be glad to see him. One veteran CNP member told the far-right Washington Times, “It will say more about the state of the conservative movement than it does McCain. If he is accepted at CNP, this will mark the official end of the conservative movement as we knew it.”

And who, exactly, is the Council for National Policy? I’m glad you asked.

U.S. News reported during the ‘04 campaign:

The supersecret Council for National Policy, founded at the onset of the Reagan era, will be meeting in New York at an undisclosed location in hopes of avoiding protesters. The thousand member group includes political heavyweights like John Ashcroft, Bill Frist, and Tom DeLay, religious leaders from Pat Robertson to James Dobson, media moguls like Steve Forbes, and conservative billionaires Howard Ahmanson and Nelson Bunker Hunt.

Conservative Republicans boast that the council’s meeting is the “real” convention. “It’s the old smoke-filled room, but I wouldn’t say it’s corrupt,” says a source. “Rather it’s just where the work gets done.”

No one really knows what kind of work gets done when these wealthy, powerful right-wingers gather in their proverbial smoke-filled room. We do know that the CNP was co-founded by Tim LaHaye, who provides the Biblical analysis for the popular, right-wing “Left Behind” novels and who has worked to advance the religious right’s agenda for decades.

We also know that the CNP’s membership reads like a who’s who of some powerful far-right players. In addition to those mentioned in the U.S. News piece, readers may recognize names such as Grover Norquist, Phyllis Schlafly, and Oliver North.

Perhaps the best mainstream report on the CNP came from ABC News a couple of years ago, which described the Council as “the most powerful conservative group you’ve never heard of.”

When Steve Baldwin, the executive director of an organization with the stale-as-old-bread name of the Council for National Policy, boasts that “we control everything in the world,” he is only half-kidding.

Half-kidding, because the council doesn’t really control the world. The staff of about eight, working in a modern office building in Fairfax, Va., isn’t even enough for a real full-court basketball game.

But also half-serious because the council has deservedly attained the reputation for conceiving and promoting the ideas of many who in fact do want to control everything in the world.

As for McCain, the Washington Times added, “‘We agreed the press could sit in a separate room and listen to the speech and the questions and answers,’ a CNP official said, speaking anonymously because the rules of the council forbid officials or members to speak by name in public.”

It should be interesting. Right Wing Watch also has a good item on the CNP.

Steve Benen is a freelance writer/researcher and creator of The Carpetbagger Report. In addition, he is the lead editor of Salon.com’s Blog Report, and has been a contributor to Talking Points Memo, Washington Monthly, Crooks & Liars, The American Prospect, and the Guardian.

© 2008 The Carpetbagger Report All rights reserved.
View this story online at: http://www.alternet.org/bloggers/http://www.thecarpetbaggerreport.com//79060/

THE RELIGIOUS RIGHT BRUTALLY EXPOSED.

  

 “What I slowly realized was that the religious-right leaders we

were helping to gain power were not ‘conservatives’ at all, in the

 old sense of the word.

They were anti-American religious revolutionaries.” 

  

Theocracy Rejected: Former Christian Right Leaders ‘Fess up

 

By Rob Boston, Church and State
Posted on March 10, 2008, Printed on March 11, 2008
http://www.alternet.org/story/78818/

Frank Schaeffer spent several years making a good living writing books promoting the Religious Right’s worldview and speaking before rapturous crowds of fundamentalist Christians.

Schaeffer, the son of evangelical guru Francis Schaeffer, was the closest thing to a rock star that politically conservative fundamentalism can offer. As the Religious Right soared in the 1980s, Schaeffer was there to ride the wave. Young, bright and charismatic, he could have founded his own Religious Right group or perhaps even launched a political career.

Twenty years have passed. What does Schaeffer think of the Religious Right today? He wouldn’t touch it with the proverbial 10-foot pole — and the feeling is mutual. A spiritual and professional crisis brought Schaeffer to the understanding that the Religious Right has it all wrong.

“My doubts really began when I realized that the people we were working with on the Religious Right were profoundly anti-American,” Schaeffer said in a recent interview. “I began to get the same vibe from them I got from my friends on the far left during the Vietnam War. They seemed to be rooting for North Vietnam. When I was working with the Religious Right, they seemed be rooting for the failure of America. Bad news was good news for them.”

Schaeffer isn’t the only ex-Religious Right activist having second thoughts these days. About 30 years ago, a young lawyer named John W. Whitehead worked alongside people like Jerry Falwell to help birth the Religious Right. Hoping to give the movement an intellectual grounding, Whitehead penned a series of books attacking the separation of church and state and demanding a government based on Christian fundamentalism.

Whitehead’s books — The Separation Illusion, The Second American Revolution and The Stealing of America — made him a popular figure in Religious Right circles. With the backing of Falwell and others, he helped found the Council for National Policy (CNP), a secretive and highly influential coalition of Religious Right groups. He also formed the Rutherford Institute, a legal group designed to promote conservative Christian causes.

Venturing into the farthest fringes of the Religious Right, Whitehead was for several years close to Rousas John Rushdoony, a leader of the Christian Reconstructionist movement that seeks to replace America’s secular republic with a theocracy based on the Old Testament’s legal codes.

Whitehead repudiated theocracy years ago. It’s unlikely he’d be welcome at a CNP meeting now.

“Politics,” he said in a recent interview, “would never even figure into Jesus’ mind. He was a homeless person. He was like Gandhi. It wasn’t in the picture. Christianity was not founded on politics. It was founded on helping the less fortunate …. That’s how you impact culture.”

Schaeffer and Whitehead are two high-profile Religious Right apostates, but they aren’t the only ones. Even Cal Thomas, who once served as vice president of the late Jerry Falwell’s Moral Majority, is critical of the Religious Right these days. Thomas in 2000 coauthored a book titled Blinded by Might: Why the Religious Right Can’t Save America.

In a column written shortly after Falwell’s death in May, Thomas opined, “The flaw in the movement was the perception that the church had become an appendage to the Republican Party and one more special interest group to be pampered. If one examines the results of the Moral Majority’s agenda, little was accomplished in the political arena and much was lost in the spiritual realm, as many came to believe that to be a Christian meant you also must be ‘converted’ to the Republican Party and adopt the GOP agenda and its tactics.”

What’s more, these critics aren’t shy about speaking out. Schaeffer details his years in the Religious Right in his recently published book Crazy for God: How I Grew Up as One Of the Elect, Helped Found the Religious Right, and Lived to Take All (or Almost All) Of It Back.

The tome is a frank tell-all loaded with broadsides against the Religious Right. Schaeffer does not hesitate to speak bluntly, as the following passages indicate:

  • “What I slowly realized was that the religious-right leaders we were helping to gain power were not ‘conservatives’ at all, in the old sense of the word. They were anti-American religious revolutionaries.”
  • “Pat Robertson would have had a hard time finding work in any job where hearing voices is not a requirement.”
  • “Long before Ralph Reed and his ilk came on the scene, Dad got sick of ‘these idiots’ as he often called people like Dobson in private. They were ‘plastic,’ Dad said, and ‘power-hungry.'”
  • “There were three kinds of evangelical leaders: The dumb or idealistic ones who really believed. The out-and-out charlatans. And the smart ones who still believed — sort of — but knew that the evangelical world was sh*t, but who couldn’t figure out any way to earn as good a living anywhere else.”

READ THE REST HERE:

http://www.alternet.org/module/printversion/78818